The Quest for the Holy Grail

holy-grail

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When approaching a discussion of one’s thoughts about the Holy Grail, it’s difficult not to be a bit circumspect. What comes to mind is the experience of King Arthur and his knights in the film Monty Python and the Holy Grail; when seeking aid from a French castle in their quest for the Grail, the French taunt Arthur’s entourage, saying, “We’ve already got one!”

Assuredly, everyone has their own vision of what the Holy Grail is and what it represents.  Nevertheless, I’m going to present my concept of it, even though you’ve already got one.

Actually, my experience of the Grail comes from a dream I had several years ago. I had picked up a copy of Marion Zimmer Bradley’s The Mists of Avalon and, so enthralled was I by her retelling of the legend, that I put aside all else and read the voluminous epic cover to cover in a couple of days. When I had finished reading I found myself quite spontaneously asking the Great Mother for a dream. I had never done such a thing before and was surprised by my own impulse. I was not disappointed.

This is the dream that emerged from my request:

I am walking through a medieval forest and encounter a path that leads into a clearing in the woods. I pass by a ritual space where a bull has been sacrificed, then join a crowd of people who are watching a priestess who stands on a raised platform.

The priestess stands behind an immense glass basin that is filled with water. In her hand she holds a crystalline goblet.

The priestess raises the goblet and speaks in a clear, strong voice that carries across the crowd, “A Grail cannot be destroyed…” she says, and with that she strikes the goblet against a stone with all of her might. The goblet is undamaged.

“But, she continues, “a Grail can be fragmented ….”, she now inserts a silver rod into the goblet and pries against the rim. A small, jagged crystal chip cracks away from the rim.

Again she raises the goblet in the air and proclaims, “A Grail cannot be filled…” plunging the goblet into the transparent basin of water as she speaks. All can see that no matter how she turns it, no water will enter the goblet.

“A Grail,” she explains, “can only fill itself.” She then holds the goblet upside down and begins rotating it in her wrist over the top of the basin. As she does so, water begins twirling in an upward spiral out of the basin, filling the still upside down goblet.

As the water fills the goblet, the goblet sings as the twirling water traces its rim. When striking the place where the goblet is chipped, rather than causing discord, the tone intensifies with harmonics.

 

Upon awakening from the dream, its interpretation was already in my consciousness.   The crystalline goblet, the Grail, is the Soul.   A Soul cannot be destroyed, but it can be wounded and fragmented*.   A purpose cannot be imposed a Soul, at least not one that will fulfill it. A Soul comes into this life with its own intentions and can only be fulfilled by that purpose. That purpose can be called forth and actualized even in seemingly impossible conditions. The wounds a Soul has endured are connected to its purpose and its fulfillment. In the process of actualizing its purpose, a Soul will resonate more intensely where it once was wounded.

What brings this dream to mind now is of course the content of some of my recent posts. When I began my Sunrise Sadhana in early April, I had no inkling that my morning ritual would take on the character of a quest and that I would imagine myself in the guise of a knight-errant.

It wasn’t simply my visiting water tower with the statues of the knights that inspired me to take on this persona, but the addition of discovering near the water tower a Little Free Library  that held a book with an image of a sword that resembled those held by the knights. The coinciding of these 3 components felt like far more than mere coincidence.

So, while it wasn’t the equivalent of having a sword bestowed upon me by the Lady of the Lake, nor the equivalent of drawing the Sword from the Stone, perhaps, if one were to be generous, one could construe my experience as receiving a sword from the Lady of the Library? Or perhaps drawing the Sword from the Shelf?  : )   In  any case, it did feel quite compelling, like the experience had been orchestrated for a purpose.

In the book that I was led to, the name of the sword is “Shadowslayer”, which, as I have blogged, has been wielded thus far only against my own shadow.   Something that is central to the Arthurian legends ~ one must be virtuous enough to find the Grail. So I have been pondering this.

 

Just last week I saw the film “Finding Joe” about Joseph Campbell and his works, so I’ve been curious what insights this venerable sage had to offer about the Grail. After a little searching, I found a wonderful article on the internet. One of my questions about the Grail was how it relates to nature; Campbell provides a profound answer to this. You can read the entire article at bottom.  There are volumes that could be said, perhaps I will write more at a later date, but here are the main takeaways for me from the article, as they relate to my dream and my present quest:

  • The theme of the Grail romance is that the land, the country, the whole territory of concern has been laid waste. It is called a wasteland. And what is the nature of the wasteland? It is a land where everybody is living an inauthentic life, doing as other people do, doing as you’re told, with no courage for your own life.
  • The Grail becomes symbolic of an authentic life that is lived in terms of its own volition, in terms of its own impulse system
  • The Grail represents the fulfillment of the highest spiritual potentialities of the human consciousness.
  • …the separation of matter and spirit, of the dynamism of life and the realm of the spirit, of natural grace and supernatural grace, has really castrated nature. And the European mind, the European life, has been, as it were, emasculated by this separation. The true spirituality, which would have come from the union of matter and spirit, has been killed.
  • Nature and spirit are yearning for each other to meet in this experience. And the Grail that these romantic legends were searching for is the union once again of what has been divided
  • And so the impulses of nature are what give authenticity to life, not the rules coming from a supernatural authority—that’s the sense of the Grail.
  • Obeying societal norms, the adventure fails.
  • And then it takes years of ordeals and embarrassments and all kinds of things to get back to a revelation of the Grail and the opportunity to heal the self and heal society, through the natural opening of the human heart. That’s the Grail.

 

Two footnotes:

* These fragments can be healed and reintegrated through therapy or  through such mediums as a Shamanic Soul Retrieval.

~  Last night I loaded the Grail picture from Monty Python. This morning I took the picture of the sunrise ~ I am struck by some similarities.

 

 

http://www.slc.edu/magazine/lost-found/2013-03-15-the-holy-grail-mag.html

 

The Holy Grail

Joseph Campbell on Western culture’s iconic quest

Adapted from “The Power of Myth” by Joseph Campbell with Bill Moyers

CAMPBELL There’s a very interesting statement about the origin of the Grail. One early writer says that the Grail was brought from heaven by the neutral angels. You see, during the war in heaven between God and Satan, between good and evil, some angelic hosts sided with Satan and some with God. The Grail was brought down through the middle by the neutral angels. It represents that spiritual path that is between pairs of opposites, between fear and desire, between good and evil.

The theme of the Grail romance is that the land, the country, the whole territory of concern has been laid waste. It is called a wasteland. And what is the nature of the wasteland? It is a land where everybody is living an inauthentic life, doing as other people do, doing as you’re told, with no courage for your own life. That is the wasteland. And that is what T. S. Eliot meant in his poem “The Waste Land.”

In a wasteland the surface does not represent the actuality of what it is supposed to be representing, and people are living inauthentic lives. “I’ve never done a thing I wanted to in all my life. I’ve done as I was told.” You know?

MOYERS And the Grail becomes?

CAMPBELL The Grail becomes the—what can we call it?—that which is attained and realized by people who have lived their own lives. The Grail represents the fulfillment of the highest spiritual potentialities of the human consciousness. The Grail King, for example, was a lovely young man, but he had not earned the position of Grail King. He rode forth from his castle with the war cry “Amor!” Well, that’s proper for youth, but it doesn’t belong to the guardianship of the Grail. And as he’s riding forth, a Muslim, a pagan knight, comes out of the woods. They both level their lances at each other, and they drive at each other. The lance of the Grail King kills the pagan, but the pagan’s lance castrates the Grail King.

What that means is that the Christian separation of matter and spirit, of the dynamism of life and the realm of the spirit, of natural grace and supernatural grace, has really castrated nature. And the European mind, the European life, has been, as it were, emasculated by this separation. The true spirituality, which would have come from the union of matter and spirit, has been killed. And then what did the pagan represent? He was a person from the suburbs of Eden. He was regarded as a nature man, and on the head of his lance was written the word “Grail.” That is to say, nature intends the Grail. Spiritual life is the bouquet, the perfume, the flowering and fulfillment of a human life, not a supernatural virtue imposed upon it.

And so the impulses of nature are what give authenticity to life, not the rules coming from a supernatural authority—that’s the sense of the Grail.

MOYERS Is this what Thomas Mann meant when he talked about mankind being the noblest work because it joins nature and spirit?

CAMPBELL Yes.

MOYERS Nature and spirit are yearning for each other to meet in this experience. And the Grail that these romantic legends were searching for is the union once again of what has been divided, the peace that comes from joining.

CAMPBELL The Grail becomes symbolic of an authentic life that is lived in terms of its own volition, in terms of its own impulse system, that carries itself between the pairs of opposites of good and evil, light and dark. One writer of the Grail legend starts his long epic with a short poem saying, “Every act has both good and evil results.” Every act in life yields pairs of opposites in its results. The best we can do is lean toward the light, toward the harmonious relationships that come from compassion with suffering, from understanding the other person. This is what the Grail is about. And this is what comes out in the romance.

In the Grail legend young Perceval has been brought up in the country by a mother who refused the courts and wanted her son to know nothing about the court rules. Perceval’s life is lived in terms of the dynamic of his own impulse system until he becomes more mature. Then he is offered a lovely young girl in marriage by her father, who has trained him to be a knight. And Perceval says, “No, I must earn a wife, not be given a wife.” And that’s the beginning of Europe.

MOYERS The beginning of Europe?

CAMPBELL Yes—the individual Europe, the Grail Europe.

Now, when Perceval comes to the Grail castle, he meets the Grail King, who is brought in on a litter, wounded, kept alive simply by the presence of the Grail. Perceval’s compassion moves him to ask, “What ails you, Uncle?” But he doesn’t ask the question because he has been taught by his instructor that a knight doesn’t ask unnecessary questions. So he obeys the rule, and the adventure fails.

And then it takes him five years of ordeals and embarrassments and all kinds of things to get back to that castle and ask the question that heals the king and heals society. The question is an expression, not of the rules of the society, but of compassion, the natural opening of the human heart to another human being. That’s the Grail.

MOYERS Eliot speaks about the still point of the turning world, where motion and stasis are together, the hub where the movement of time and the stillness of eternity are together.

CAMPBELL That’s the inexhaustible center that is represented by the Grail. When life comes into being, it is neither afraid nor desiring, it is just becoming. Then it gets into being, and it begins to be afraid and desiring. When you can get rid of fear and desire and just get back to where you’re becoming, you’ve hit the spot. … The goal of your quest for knowledge of yourself is to be found at that burning point in yourself, that becoming thing in yourself, which is innocent of the goods and evils of the world as already become, and therefore desireless and fearless. That is the condition of a warrior going into battle with perfect courage. That is life in movement. That is the essence of the mysticism of war as well as of a plant growing. I think of grass—you know, every two weeks a chap comes out with a lawnmower and cuts it down. Suppose the grass were to say, “Well, for Pete’s sake, what’s the use if you keep getting cut down this way?” Instead, it keeps on growing. That’s the sense of the energy of the center. That’s the meaning of the image of the Grail, of the inexhaustible fountain, of the source. The source doesn’t care what happens once it gives into being. It’s the giving and coming into being that counts, and that’s the becoming life point in you. That’s what all these myths are concerned to tell you.

 

37 thoughts on “The Quest for the Holy Grail

  1. Cnawan…WOW! WOW!! Just experienced so much of this in the last two months..stepping out of societal norms..We just got back from Yosemite and experienced such a wholeness…living here in Maui…helps to integrate…which is what I just blogged about…I have always been a way seer…yet never EVER had it explained like you just did…LOVING what Campbell gave us all to see…Mankind…the noblest of all…joining nature and spirit ….What an amazing Blog I am going to Reblog this Cnawan… inexhaustible CENTER… Heart to Heart Robyn

    • Robyn, thanks so much. You’re so awesome. Will check out your blog straight away. And thanks for reblogging!

  2. • Very insightful post on a subject that has engaged serious minds for ages and one that is very dear to my heart! It is an enlightening contribution to the knowledge about the Holy Grail on earth, for instance, with statements like “The Grail represents the fulfillment of the highest spiritual potentialities of the human consciousness.” Absolutely true!
    • I can only add that there is a comprehensive work on The Holy Grail in a 3-volume book series “The Grail Message “(In The Light of Truth) by Abd-ru-shin which has a free read/downloadable copy online @ http://grailmessage.com/en/contents/ Big thanks for sharing your thoughts!

  3. Reblogged this on Laura Bruno's Blog and commented:
    I LOVE this post! It touches upon so many of my very favorite things. A perfect birthday treat for this Mists of Avalon and Joseph Campbell fan. Cnawan has a way with words, symbols and photographs. I am so enjoying his journey, and the dream he shares is worth the read alone!

  4. I, too, have been shown that we ARE the Grail, so this indeed resonated. Thank you for sharing your insights on it.

  5. Reblogged this on Tania Marie's Blog and commented:
    This is a really beautiful post by Cnawan Fahey. I had missed it on my feed, as this has been quite a busy week, but it popped up from my dear Laura Bruno, who celebrates a birthday today, as a reblog. And I’m so glad it did. What I love most is not just the beautiful and powerfully symbolic dream that Cnawan shares about the Holy Grail, but the wonderful interpretation that he shares of it, as related to each Soul that I feel can help one to understand the strength, resiliency, and magick that is latent in the very essence of who you are.

    Cnawan also shares a really insightful article by Joseph Campbell , again with interpretative take-aways that are supportive in understanding and leading an authentic life.

    I hope you enjoy it.

  6. Pingback: Laura Bruno – The Quest For The Holy Grail – 22 May 2014 | Lucas 2012 Infos

  7. wonderful post…I came back this morning to read again….
    sometimes as I read someone’s thoughts it feels like a journey within a journey
    to see pieces of someone’s path and feel the similar energy….
    the Quest fro the Holy Grail so to speak has taken me down and up many roads…
    I will return again, as I enjoyed very much the dream and your sword…Mist of Avalon is
    a book I have by my side as I always return to it and discover something new I need
    to know….or perhaps remember ? 🙂
    I will have to look up Joseph Campbell…
    Thank you for sharing so much of you and your thoughts…
    Take Care….You Matter….
    )0(
    maryrose

    • Dearest Maryrose, as always, thank you for your lovely thoughts! if you are unfamiliar with Joseph Campbell, the best place to start is the PBS series/book The Power of Myth. Bill Moyers did a series of interviews with Campbell for PBS way back in the 80’s i think, called The Power of Myth, that was then transcribed into a book by the same name. So wonderful and very accessible. This will give you a suitable affection and respect for the man and his work for you to adequately appreciate the film “Finding Joe”.

      • Thank you, I had meant to come back last night, but the design I am working for a quilt in progress ( I tend to sew as i make up my mind what to put LOLs) seem to not let go ..
        I will look in to the PBS series…hopefully on youtube ( I don’t watch TV anymore)
        I liked the clip of the movie you put up the link too, I will look for it too…
        I came to this piece because I wanted to read it before the other one
        “Apotheosis, Drinking from the Holy Grail…and as usual you have shown me many different trails to wander on…But I will be back to the other one …(and catching up on others I have marked)
        Thank you again for your thoughts and responses…I appreciate them
        Take Care…You Matter…
        )0(
        maryrose

  8. Jung and Campbell have long been my guides. The tales of the Grail and the wounded Fisher King who must be healed through the re-union of spirit and nature are basic to understanding the mayhem that has developed in the world today because greed and the drive for power have castrated the beauty and unity. You have written a brilliant post. Thank you.

  9. Absolutely loved this. Stabbed me with the most delicious inspiration for a piece of my own. Huge into dreams as well and loved your own dream story of the crystal challis. Just lovely.

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