Feeding Baby Hummingbirds

We are delighted to share a video featuring two of our tiniest patients. A nest, complete with tiny Ruby-throated Hummingbird chicks arrived yesterday after it came down in a storm. We were not able to replace it, but will continue to try when weather clears. Few people have the honor of witnessing baby hummingbirds as they are fed. Their parent are not doing the feeding, we think they are still pretty amazing. Hummingbirds eat aphids and other tiny insects as well as nectar. Protein is vital to hummingbirds all of their life, but especially so as babies when they are growing quickly. There is a small syringe at the other end of the feeding tube that is not visible on the video. Their formula is a complicated mixture of crushed and powdered insects and a homemade nectar base along with digestive enzymes, which they get from their parents naturally during feeding.

Posted by Raptor Education Group, Inc. on Wednesday, July 24, 2013

And, I am now reminded of how I once rescued a Hummingbird…..

I was out paddling my canoe on a lake that I was exploring for the first time; the winds were calm and the waters were as placid as could be.   Far out from shore, near some cattails that projected up from a submerged island, I noticed this small, persistent  rippling area in the glassy surface of the lake.  Curious, I paddled over, and there discovered a Hummingbird, struggling for its life in the water.

I slowly slid my paddle beneath the frantic bird and gently lifted her out of the lake.  Then carefully slid her down onto one of the empty seats (I was kneeling in the middle of the canoe).  Once sure of her footing on the seat, she hung her wings out to dry, resembling a tiny cormorant in her pose.  But she was panting terrifically and I could tell she was exhausted from her struggles and from the cold water draining her energy.

I quickly paddled to the shore, and after passing the dock of one cabin, I found that the next cabin had a Hummingbird feeder hanging from its eves.

Somehow I managed to nudge the poor bedraggled bird back on the paddle and set her down on the dock.   I then flagged down the owner, who had seen me through her window, and who promised me that she would look after the bird.

The experience cast a magical spell over the rest of my time on the lake.

They are such delicate creatures…

 

 

 

Rise & Shine

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This Hummingbird greeted me on the sidewalk on my way home:

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The mysteries of the Hummingbird –

Never flapping their wings, but rotating them in a figure 8,

they reach near-infinities in flight –

Wingbeats of 70 times per second when casually flitting about.

Wingbeats of 200 times per second when in a high-speed dive.

Drinking of the nectar of life.

Heartbeats beating for joy 21 times per second.

Wolf Medicine

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Mexican Wolf Population Now Tops 100 in US

15 years ago I led a small group who carried the Wolf energy from Minnesota down to New Mexico to do a blessing ritual for the Mexican Gray Wolves that were being reintroduced into the wild.

Minnesota at one time sheltered the last remaining wild wolves in the lower 48 states, so it seemed fitting that we give some spiritual assistance to this noble effort.

Thus, I was so pleased to read the article linked below, that tells of how the wolves, after a very rough start, have been flourishing.

This is just wonderful news to share for all those who feel a connection to our animal brothers and sisters.

http://news.yahoo.com/mexican-wolf-population-now-tops-100-us-123358887.html

The Mexican wolf (Canis lupus baileyi), a smaller subspecies of gray wolf, was hunted out of the wild in the United States by the 1970s.

Once driven to the brink extinction in the United States, the population of Mexican wolves has doubled in the past five years.

— there are now 19 packs, with at least 53 wolves in New Mexico and 56 wolves in Arizona. The 2014 total also included 38 wild-born pups that survived through the end of the year

(keep reading more at the link)

I could discuss the Wolf energy, and how Wolf can assist one as a spirit animal; but rather than doing that, I would love to hear about other people’s  experience with Wolf Medicine ~ So please share!

 

Indigenous Realism

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Indigenous Realism has taught me so much.

So grateful for the diversity of human cultures:
~ those cultures that have focused upon the intellect, developing tools to explore the mystery of existence through science, deepening our understanding and changing our lives through the evolution of technology.

~ those cultures that have focused upon the intuition, developing tools to explore the mystery of existence through spirituality, deepening our understanding and changing our lives through the evolution of the soul.

Dancing with the Yin and the Yang.  Gotta love it.

Explore the Great Mystery.
Evolve.

 

 

Groundhog Days ~ And Nights

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For those of you with a touch of Groundhog energy, here’s some new info to flesh out your understanding…

Woodchucks aren’t forecasting the weather when they emerge—they’re looking for love

The Truth about Groundhog Day
http://www.nwf.org/news-and-magazines/national-wildlife/animals/archives/2006/groundhogs.aspx

Stam Zervanos, a biology professor at Pennsylvania State University’s Berks-Lehigh Valley College has made a discovery that could, um, cast a shadow on Groundhog Day. Male woodchucks, as the animals are also known, aren’t checking the weather when they wake up in early February, says Zervanos. They’re scoping for potential mates.

Yes, Groundhog Day is more like Valentine’s Day. When a male groundhog wakes up in February from its three-month-long hibernation, he leaves his burrow and goes for a stroll around the ol’ territory—a tract of about 2 to 3 acres. When he comes to a female’s burrow (there may be several within his territory), he ducks inside and stays the night. The next morning he continues on his tour. “Each male visits two or three females,” says Zervanos.

But he is pretty sure the sleepover parties are tame. “We know they are not mating because no baby groundhogs are born in early March,” he says. (The groundhog gestation period is about 30 days.) After the February cuddlefest, the male goes back to his own pad, rolls up in a ball and sleeps for another month.

So what’s with the rodent sleepovers? “They’re a chance to bond,” Zervanos suggests. The February visits may serve as “getting to know you” sessions—obviating the need to spend lots of time exchanging biological details in March. As far as Zervanos knows, this speed-dating behavior is unique to groundhogs. “I think it’s a major find,” he says.

When the groundhogs wake up for good in March, the males drop in on the females again for a week of wild groundhog mating.

Zervanos still has questions about groundhogs. He wonders if females are ever visited by more than one male