Ode to Autumn

keats - ode to autumn
Ode to Autumn
by John Keats

SEASON of mists and mellow fruitfulness,
Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun;
Conspiring with him how to load and bless
With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eaves run;
To bend with apples the moss’d cottage-trees,
And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core;
To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells
With a sweet kernel; to set budding more,
And still more, later flowers for the bees,
Until they think warm days will never cease;
For Summer has o’erbrimm’d their clammy cells.

Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store?
Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find
Thee sitting careless on a granary floor,
Thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind;
Or on a half-reap’d furrow sound asleep,
Drowsed with the fume of poppies, while thy hook
Spares the next swath and all its twinèd flowers:
And sometimes like a gleaner thou dost keep
Steady thy laden head across a brook;
Or by a cyder-press, with patient look,
Thou watchest the last oozings, hours by hours.

Where are the songs of Spring? Ay, where are they?
Think not of them, thou hast thy music too,—
While barrèd clouds bloom the soft-dying day
And touch the stubble-plains with rosy hue;
Then in a wailful choir the small gnats mourn
Among the river-sallows, borne aloft
Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies;
And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn;
Hedge-crickets sing; and now with treble soft
The redbreast whistles from a garden-croft;
And gathering swallows twitter in the skies.

Thomas Hood on Autumn

Not only misery, but melancholy also loves company. For those who might like to share a bit over a misty cup of tea, here is your indulgence. But I must follow this up with John Keat’s “Ode to Autumn”, for the season would not be complete without it. Thank you, Adrienne, for sharing Mr. Hood’s reflections!

Nothing Gilded, Nothing Gained-Period Drama on Paper at Middlemay Farm

Thomas Hood 1799–1845 Thomas Hood
1799–1845

Autumn

I Saw old Autumn in the misty morn
Stand shadowless like Silence, listening
To silence, for no lonely bird would sing
Into his hollow ear from woods forlorn,
Nor lowly hedge nor solitary thorn;—
Shaking his languid locks all dewy bright
With tangled gossamer that fell by night,
Pearling his coronet of golden corn.

Henry Herbert La Thangue Henry Herbert La Thangue

Where are the songs of Summer?—With the sun,
Oping the dusky eyelids of the south,
Till shade and silence waken up as one,
And Morning sings with a warm odorous mouth.
Where are the merry birds?—Away, away,
On panting wings through the inclement skies,
Lest owls should prey
Undazzled at noonday,
And tear with horny beak their lustrous eyes.

John Atkinson Grimshaw John Atkinson Grimshaw

Where are the blooms of Summer?—In the west,
Blushing their last to the last sunny hours,
When the mild Eve by sudden Night is prest
Like…

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Happy Equinox!

There is just so much Equinox energy to share! Enjoy the music that Laura has introduced us to…

Laura Bruno's Blog

Happy Spring to my friends and readers Down Under, and Happy Autumnal Equinox to everyone in the Northern Hemisphere. I’ve been so busy doing very Mabon-like things — harvesting, drying, canning, freezing, making sun tea, and cooking a vegan mung bean stew in the SunOven. So busy, in fact, that even though I scheduled today off for myself, this is the first chance I’ve had to sit down long enough to write a blog post. It’s a short one at that. Here’s a lovely music video I found to celebrate the Fall season, before I head outside to turn the SunOven and move masses of mulch. Wishing you all a beautiful, transformative day! Blessings and love … Laura

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“Falling” into the Grace of You – Welcome Autumn Equinox

Tania expands upon the equinox theme wonderfully…

Tania Marie's Blog

pema chodron

There is indeed a continuum of increasing shifts and transitions taking place for everyone on so many levels, which brings us yet again to another seasonal transformation, both within and without.

Yes, Autumn is upon us, and that heads us toward a period of less “light out there” so that we find the source of true “light in here” – within you. This is a time to make friends with your own inner darkness and nurturing it, as this engaged healing integration is vital for soul growth.

It is time to face your shadow! To mingle intimately with it and immerse in its gooey depths. To face your darkest fears and retrieve back into you all of the projections and separation created, so that you can transmute it through the alchemy of your heart.

You can no longer – the collective can no longer – function without this integration taking…

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The Elegant Peacock

complex order
inherent in the universe
proof, it is claimed
that He exists
the handiwork of God.
One look upon the peacock
proof, it must be
that She exists
beauty beyond comprehension
that only the Goddess
could imagine
and what God
would wear such a cloak
unless courting heavenly bliss
Krishna courting his Queen

Jet Eliot

Peacock in Texas Peacock in Texas

A dazzling bouquet of feathers to ease into the new week.

Photo credit:  Athena Alexander

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Blackbird, Red-Winged

This post from Barb is quite wonderful. Her lovely verse reminds me so much of the lines from Peter Mayer’s song, “Holy Now”
“This morning outside I stood
saw a little red-winged bird
shining like a burning bush
singing like a scripture verse…”

Barb’s post inspires me to share Mayer’s song, and Sunday is the perfect day for it, so I’ll try to add a link to it. His words express so well the shift in perspective that “Everything is Holy Now”.

The World Is Like a Divine Language

Exploring the same theme as Emerson’s “Essay on Nature”, this discourse on the symbolism of nature is exceptionally penetrating…

symbolreader

Image

René Guénon

“1. … symbolism seems to us to be quite specially adapted to the needs of human nature, which is not exclusively intellectual but which needs a sensory basis from which to rise to higher levels.

2. Fundamentally, every expression, every formulation, whatever it may be, is a symbol of the thought which it expresses outwardly. In this sense, language itself is nothing other than symbolism. There can be no opposition, therefore, between the use of words and the use of figurative symbols; rather, these two modes of expression should be complementary one to another (moreover, they may in fact be combined, for primitive writing is ideographic and sometimes, as in China, it has always retained this characteristic). Generally speaking, the form of language is analytical and ‘discursive’ , as is human reason of which it is the true and fitting instrument and the flow of which it reproduces…

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